View Full Version : Pre Relaxer regimen


jusstoya
08-12-2009, 07:24 PM
Hello! I am getting a relaxer after 5 months and I was wondering what are some of your pre and post relaxer regimens.

I've read some people use Aphogee 2 min. reconstructor before neutralizing, I wanted to know the benefits of this, and also is it necessary to use porosity control. Any info you can provide will be helpful. TIA

marchoftheblackqueen
08-12-2009, 08:16 PM
I don't know much about pre & post regimens but I do suggest using a protein treatment before you get the relaxer or before neutralizing. The aphogee can help add strength to the hair after the relaxer. There are more benefits but I don't remember them at the moment, sorry :(
bumping for answers!

jusstoya
08-12-2009, 08:31 PM
thak you motbq.
I did a hardcore protein treatment about a week and a half ago, when I took my micros down.

marchoftheblackqueen
08-12-2009, 08:33 PM
That should be good since people say to get one at least a week before the relaxer :)

leentora
08-12-2009, 09:19 PM
Ok I would suggest one week before relaxer do a hardcore protein treatment as protein is main purpose is to strengthen the hair, so rebuild the strands of the hair one week prior to your chemical process.
(There is two Hardcore Protein treatment I own, one cheap (very good) and one expensive (very good) > cheap one is Aphogee two-step and the expensive is Keracare Super Reconstructor!

You may want to opt for the Aphogee two-step due to the price difference!

Next step is when you come to relax the hair you can do a light/medium protein treatment after your relaxer, this helps to strength the hair due to the chemical shock the hair has just been put through, then you can proceed to normalizing shampooing the hair.
Here again I own 4 light/medium protein treamtent > cheap is ORS replenish pak which I think is more moisturizing after several uses, then the Aphogee Keratin 2 min reconstrcutor this is good and should be followed up after you use the normalizing shampoo with a DC moisturizing conditioner.
Pricey > I have porosity Mendex - YET TO try and I ahve the Affirm 5in1 reconstructor which is brilliant but more pricey! After the protein treatment then you would follow up with a DC moisturizing conditioner to add moisture back to the hair as protein tend to dry the hair out as it's main purpose is to strengthen the hair.

Now to Hair Porosity:
There are 3 Roux Porosity Formulae > Alpha 5in1 Shampooo, Mendex Treatment and the Porosity Conditioner, I own all three but I have only managed to use th Conditioner so far and it is good, porosity conditioner helps to the hair to absorb moisture, water or chemical deep into the hair cuticle layers/curtex.

You need the porosity of your hair to be somewhat in the middle similar to the balancing of the Potential Hydrogen (pH) in the hair!

Porosity
http://www.hairfinder.com/hairquestions/hairporosity.jpg

I mean a quicker way to balance hair porosity or mend/patch up damaged cuticle layers is by doing a protein treatment. Protein fills in gaps, binds and strenthen damaged places within individual exterior scales along the hair cuticle.

You start out for a short period doing the protein treatment say once a week or fortnightly but don't over do it as protein will dry the hair out and will resutl in dryness and breakage later, and I suggest you follow up with a Deep moiturizing conditioner so balance things out and adds subtleness back to the hair.< Again this would have been done or gained when you use the protein treatment after your relaxer so you odn't realy need to use any further porosity treatment!

I hope I have not confused, please let me know if you need me to clarify or made more simple the above lol! As I tend to get carried away when I get into hair care lol :p

jusstoya
08-12-2009, 09:56 PM
Very informative. Thank you Leentora. lol I followed you. I recently purchased the aphogee 2 min. reconstructer so I will be using that , then neutralize and DC. got ya. thanks again!

evanny
08-13-2009, 09:10 AM
My relaxer regimen is as follows:

5 days before my relaxer is my last wash day. On this day I clarify my hair, do the Aphogee 2 step protein treatment, and use a heavy moisturizing DC. On the days leading up to the relaxer I moisturize and seal and wear my hair in buns. I don't brush or comb, I just use my fingers to put my hair in the bun and I use a headband to hide imperfections. :o I also lightly base my scalp with oil on the days leading up to the relaxer. I'm very afraid of chemical burns.

On the day of the relaxer I base my scalp and edges with a very thick oil. I use my sealant mixture which is a mixture of a bunch of different oils. I apply a moisturizing conditioner and the sealant mixture to my ends, especially the line of demarcation. My mom then applies my relaxer and leaves it in for the allotted time. I then rinse out the relaxer from my hair. I then apply the Aphogee 2 minute reconstructor for 5 minutes. After that I rinse out the reconstructor and neutralize my hair. I lather with neutralizing shampoo and let it sit in my hair for 5 minutes, I do this twice. (the second neutralizing shampoo wash out I mix a chelating shampoo with it to get rid of mineral deposits left in the hair from the relaxer.) If I feel the need, I do it again. I then wash with a moisturizing shampoo. (A lot of washes huh? LOL I'm paranoid about relaxer staying in my hair.) I do a quick 10 minute condition with a cheapie conditioner. I then do a DC with my go to conditioner heavy moisturizing conditioner for 30 minutes with heat. It's a mixture of both moisture and protein, more moisture than protein though. After the 30 minutes I walk around with the conditioner in my hair until I feel like risning it out. A lot of the time I'm watching a movie and don't feel like getting up. LOL!! I do a cool water rinse, and then I add my leave ins. I do a protein leave in and then a moisturizing leave in. I then seal my hair. (I like sealing on wet hair)

4 days post I wash my hair. I neutralize it again too. IDK why, I just do LOL. I then use my moisturizing shampoo, and I do the quick condition, and then the DC and seal and stuff.

***Now this works very well for me. I started doing it this way after I had a terrible set back and my hair has thrived from it. What works for me may or may not work for some.***

jusstoya
08-13-2009, 11:33 AM
thanks Evanny.

which oil do you use to base you scalp? I'm terrified of chemical burns too. lol

evanny
08-13-2009, 03:40 PM
thanks Evanny.

which oil do you use to base you scalp? I'm terrified of chemical burns too. lol

It's a mixture of a bunch of oils. It's coconut, castor, olive, sweet almond, grape seed, vitamin e, avocado, and jojoba oils mixed together. My hair loves it.

jusstoya
08-14-2009, 04:10 PM
thanks everyone :P

lamaria211
09-25-2009, 12:13 PM
Really good realxer question. so i relaxed my hair and it didnt get straight at all i think i may have over based my scalp so my question is that since my hair was severley under processed can i relax again sonner than eight weeks?????

naomimaxine927
09-25-2009, 12:58 PM
I didn't really have a pre relaxer process. Just got some vaseline, put it around my hairline all around, and on the tip of my ears, Part my hair, and I used a brush, it kinda looked like paint brush, to put it in my hair, and part as I go. I would leave it on until it started ''
itching'', and I would wash it out with the shampoo, they gave me, and dced after. I would blowdry my hair, and then wrap it. I used ors normal relaxer.

angel_hair
09-26-2009, 06:17 AM
Really good realxer question. so i relaxed my hair and it didnt get straight at all i think i may have over based my scalp so my question is that since my hair was severley under processed can i relax again sonner than eight weeks?????

I would say no, however do a protien treatment before you decide to do anything. I recommend the Aphogee two-step treatment, however there are others.

GOOD Luck!

angel_hair
09-26-2009, 06:26 AM
My relaxer regimen is as follows:

5 days before my relaxer is my last wash day. On this day I clarify my hair, do the Aphogee 2 step protein treatment, and use a heavy moisturizing DC. On the days leading up to the relaxer I moisturize and seal and wear my hair in buns. I don't brush or comb, I just use my fingers to put my hair in the bun and I use a headband to hide imperfections. :o I also lightly base my scalp with oil on the days leading up to the relaxer. I'm very afraid of chemical burns.

On the day of the relaxer I base my scalp and edges with a very thick oil. I use my sealant mixture which is a mixture of a bunch of different oils. I apply a moisturizing conditioner and the sealant mixture to my ends, especially the line of demarcation. My mom then applies my relaxer and leaves it in for the allotted time. I then rinse out the relaxer from my hair. I then apply the Aphogee 2 minute reconstructor for 5 minutes. After that I rinse out the reconstructor and neutralize my hair. I lather with neutralizing shampoo and let it sit in my hair for 5 minutes, I do this twice. (the second neutralizing shampoo wash out I mix a chelating shampoo with it to get rid of mineral deposits left in the hair from the relaxer.) If I feel the need, I do it again. I then wash with a moisturizing shampoo. (A lot of washes huh? LOL I'm paranoid about relaxer staying in my hair.) I do a quick 10 minute condition with a cheapie conditioner. I then do a DC with my go to conditioner heavy moisturizing conditioner for 30 minutes with heat. It's a mixture of both moisture and protein, more moisture than protein though. After the 30 minutes I walk around with the conditioner in my hair until I feel like risning it out. A lot of the time I'm watching a movie and don't feel like getting up. LOL!! I do a cool water rinse, and then I add my leave ins. I do a protein leave in and then a moisturizing leave in. I then seal my hair. (I like sealing on wet hair)

4 days post I wash my hair. I neutralize it again too. IDK why, I just do LOL. I then use my moisturizing shampoo, and I do the quick condition, and then the DC and seal and stuff.

***Now this works very well for me. I started doing it this way after I had a terrible set back and my hair has thrived from it. What works for me may or may not work for some.***

Similiar to my process Evanny. I am afraid of not wash the relaxer completely as well. I do not want to suffer any SETBACKS!!!! Only going forward from here. I DC'ed yesterday and my hair lovessss this.

Ms. Bing
10-04-2009, 09:43 AM
I don't do anything special just try not to scratch.

lamaria211
10-16-2009, 01:00 PM
So Its Been Six Weeks Since My Last Relaxer(during My Last Relaxer I Over Based And Added Oil To My Per So My Hair Was Severly Under Processed) And I Have Over An Inch Of New Growth. And My Hair Is Breaking Even After I Did The Aphogee 2 Step Last Week I Am 99% Sure That The Breakage Is Due To The Fact That I Need A Relaxer Should I Relax Or Try Another Protien Or Moisture Treatment. I Have Done Several Moisture Treatments And Claryfied Still Breakage, I Have 4z Hair Whhich Is Naturally Dry(im Asumming) Some One Help
Dry Breaking Hair!!!!

lamaria211
10-19-2009, 09:48 AM
so i deciede to wait and not relax i did a super moisture treatment on sat and things are 100% better!!!

Nesa3
11-20-2009, 07:44 PM
so what if u dont use protein treatments & everything...what other things could u do

Tall, Black Canadian
11-20-2009, 09:10 PM
so what if u dont use protein treatments & everything...what other things could u do

If you don't do the treatments, the best thing you can do to protect your hair (especially if you go to the salon) is to base your scalp and put a protective oil coat on your already relaxed hair. The oil coat will protect your hair from relaxer overlap and over processing, which will make your hair weak.

If you use the salon, they may be doing a light protein without your realizing. If they put on a conditioner and leave it for a few minutes, you are more than likely getting a light protein. Several relaxer systems do this. If you relax at home, there is no reason why you can't put the extra step in because it takes only a few minutes and it's amazing how much better your hair can look and feel. Use and ORS pak or a generic protein conditioner - look for almond, soy, silk, olive, or just the word protein on the label.

HTH

Dividir
11-23-2009, 04:01 AM
Ahhhh!
I do believe I'll need to do a protein treatment a week before my next relax. I am thinking January

lamaria211
11-24-2009, 03:20 PM
my relaxer regimen changes everytime i learn something new

jusstoya
12-29-2009, 12:54 PM
I found this and wanted to share.

Want to learn how to prepare your hair for chemical relaxing and straightening? This article will teach you a four-step hair preparation strategy that you can use to protect your hair just prior to any chemical relaxer service!

We must begin with the obvious: chemical hair relaxing is a very stressful process on the hair. Because of the aggressive nature of these straightening chemicals and the extreme consequences that may arise from improper usage, careful thought and consideration should be given to preparing the hair for this process.

Prepping the Hair:
First and foremost, only begin the relaxer process with hair that is in tip top shape. Many of us say: Oh my hair is breaking...or shedding let me go ahead relax it! But, you must understand that you are taking a huge gamble with your hair health by proceeding with a chemical relaxer application on compromised hair.
Never relax your hair to "solve" a hair problem. You should always correct the problem first with the proper treatment. If your problem is hair breakage, you must pinpoint the cause of the breakage and treat the hair accordingly. You'll simply need to increase the moisture you give your hair if your breakage is from an overuse of protein, or increase the protein if your breakage is a result of over-conditioning. If your problem is shedding, be patient and let nature do what it needs to do first. Some have had success with garlic shampoo treatments for shedding problems, but because shedding is a response to natural, hormonal processes, topical treatments may not work.

Only when your hair and scalp have returned to normal should you proceed with your relaxer service. Relaxing your hair will only aggravate the condition you are facing by making your hair weaker and more vulnerable to damage. These strong chemicals could cause you even more breakage, shedding, or permanent hair loss if done to fix an existing hair problem. I cannot stress this enough ladies, relaxing should never be used as a means of correcting hair issues. You must solve the problems of shedding, dryness, or breakage BEFORE you relax your hair.

Your 4 Step Pre-Relaxer Game Plan
Preparing your hair for a relaxer is one of the best things you can do for your hair heath.You can follow these pre and post relaxer strategies whether you self relax or see a stylist for your chemical treatments. Ensuring your hair is in top physical condition prior to the relaxer service will give you better results with the finished product.

Step 1: Clean it Up!
Your final shampooing should take place on the last 3-5 days before your relaxer. At this wash (particularly if you desire a straighter, more thoroughly processed result), you should use a clarifying shampoo to remove any deposits or product buildup on the hair. A clarifiying shampoo, or any "stripping" shampoo containing the detergents Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate or Ammonium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate will be strong enough to remove buildup and maintain a clean and clear head of hair. (Assuming you use minimal or non- heavy products leading up to your hair service.) I highly recommend Pantene Pro-V Purity Shampoo ($3-5) for clarifying purposes. If you do not wish to have a bone straight look and prefer some texture, then you may continue to apply your products in their normal ratios up until the relaxer.

You should treat your hair to a protein treatment the final wash before your relaxer. Follow up the treatment with a good moisturizing deep conditioning. Giving your hair a protein treatment in the days leading up to your relaxer application gives your hair little more protein to work with going into the relaxer. This prevents the relaxing process from totally compromising the strength of your hair when your inner protein bonds are manipulated. To determine which strength of protein reconstructor to use, I would first do a breakage assessment of the hair. If you are already having some breakage, I would go with a moderate to heavy treatment for damaged hair. I recommend the Aphogee Treament for Damaged Hair (under $8) for heavy protein conditioning. If you don't have any noticeable breakage, then a lighter/milder treatment should be fine. I recommend Aphogee 2 Minute Keratin Reconstructor or Motions CPR Conditioner for light protein conditioning. Both products are less than $5 at any beauty supply store. You can substitute whatever brand of protein reconstructor/conditioner you like to use. Do not proceed with the relaxer application if you are still having noticable breakage or shedding. After you have completed steps 1 and 2, do not wash, scratch, or do anything to disturb your scalp.

Step 3: Protect It!
The day of relaxer, pay special attention to the length and ends of your hair. The hair shaft and ends are especially vulnerable to damage from the relaxing process unless you protect them. Applying a light coating of something like olive oil, castor oil, a thick conditioner, grease or vaseline to your scalp and hair past the new growth prevents the rest of your hair from being "re-relaxed" as a result of overlapping and runoff during the final rinsing of the relaxer. Protection for the length and ends of the hair is essential because the short, compact nature of the new growth makes it is virtually impossible to avoid overlap. This "chemical run" and lack of protection for the shaft and ends is one of the many reasons quite a few relaxed ladies have thinner, and thinner ends.

Also remember, that oiling the new growth itself may leave you underprocessed because the relaxer has to penetrate through the layers you have put on. If you want a straighter turnout, be sure that you do not coat your new growth-- only coat your scalp and hair shaft past the new growth. As always, apply protective base (vaseline, oil, grease) to your scalp, tops of ears, and other sensitive areas . The base will give you an extra layer of protection between the relaxer crème and those areas.

Sharii16
02-27-2010, 12:18 PM
I Will Be Trying This........Soon . I May Stick With Stretching . :(

choshi1
03-01-2010, 08:21 AM
Thanks for all the tips, next relaxer i will have a definite regimen.

fooshenip
03-09-2010, 06:26 PM
Hello, I just wanted to put my two-cents in. The recommendations are awesome. They are also very good for to use just before coloring your hair. The protein helps to rebuild the cuticle of the hair so that the color grabs onto the hair stronger and last longer.

jusstoya
03-09-2010, 09:34 PM
Hello, I just wanted to put my two-cents in. The recommendations are awesome. They are also very good for to use just before coloring your hair. The protein helps to rebuild the cuticle of the hair so that the color grabs onto the hair stronger and last longer.

Thanks and Welcome to BHP!

jusstoya
07-02-2010, 08:30 PM
I found this and wanted to share.

Want to learn how to prepare your hair for chemical relaxing and straightening? This article will teach you a four-step hair preparation strategy that you can use to protect your hair just prior to any chemical relaxer service!

We must begin with the obvious: chemical hair relaxing is a very stressful process on the hair. Because of the aggressive nature of these straightening chemicals and the extreme consequences that may arise from improper usage, careful thought and consideration should be given to preparing the hair for this process.

Prepping the Hair:
First and foremost, only begin the relaxer process with hair that is in tip top shape. Many of us say: Oh my hair is breaking...or shedding let me go ahead relax it! But, you must understand that you are taking a huge gamble with your hair health by proceeding with a chemical relaxer application on compromised hair.
Never relax your hair to "solve" a hair problem. You should always correct the problem first with the proper treatment. If your problem is hair breakage, you must pinpoint the cause of the breakage and treat the hair accordingly. You'll simply need to increase the moisture you give your hair if your breakage is from an overuse of protein, or increase the protein if your breakage is a result of over-conditioning. If your problem is shedding, be patient and let nature do what it needs to do first. Some have had success with garlic shampoo treatments for shedding problems, but because shedding is a response to natural, hormonal processes, topical treatments may not work.

Only when your hair and scalp have returned to normal should you proceed with your relaxer service. Relaxing your hair will only aggravate the condition you are facing by making your hair weaker and more vulnerable to damage. These strong chemicals could cause you even more breakage, shedding, or permanent hair loss if done to fix an existing hair problem. I cannot stress this enough ladies, relaxing should never be used as a means of correcting hair issues. You must solve the problems of shedding, dryness, or breakage BEFORE you relax your hair.

Your 4 Step Pre-Relaxer Game Plan
Preparing your hair for a relaxer is one of the best things you can do for your hair heath.You can follow these pre and post relaxer strategies whether you self relax or see a stylist for your chemical treatments. Ensuring your hair is in top physical condition prior to the relaxer service will give you better results with the finished product.

Step 1: Clean it Up!
Your final shampooing should take place on the last 3-5 days before your relaxer. At this wash (particularly if you desire a straighter, more thoroughly processed result), you should use a clarifying shampoo to remove any deposits or product buildup on the hair. A clarifiying shampoo, or any "stripping" shampoo containing the detergents Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate or Ammonium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate will be strong enough to remove buildup and maintain a clean and clear head of hair. (Assuming you use minimal or non- heavy products leading up to your hair service.) I highly recommend Pantene Pro-V Purity Shampoo ($3-5) for clarifying purposes. If you do not wish to have a bone straight look and prefer some texture, then you may continue to apply your products in their normal ratios up until the relaxer.

You should treat your hair to a protein treatment the final wash before your relaxer. Follow up the treatment with a good moisturizing deep conditioning. Giving your hair a protein treatment in the days leading up to your relaxer application gives your hair little more protein to work with going into the relaxer. This prevents the relaxing process from totally compromising the strength of your hair when your inner protein bonds are manipulated. To determine which strength of protein reconstructor to use, I would first do a breakage assessment of the hair. If you are already having some breakage, I would go with a moderate to heavy treatment for damaged hair. I recommend the Aphogee Treament for Damaged Hair (under $8) for heavy protein conditioning. If you don't have any noticeable breakage, then a lighter/milder treatment should be fine. I recommend Aphogee 2 Minute Keratin Reconstructor or Motions CPR Conditioner for light protein conditioning. Both products are less than $5 at any beauty supply store. You can substitute whatever brand of protein reconstructor/conditioner you like to use. Do not proceed with the relaxer application if you are still having noticable breakage or shedding. After you have completed steps 1 and 2, do not wash, scratch, or do anything to disturb your scalp.

Step 3: Protect It!
The day of relaxer, pay special attention to the length and ends of your hair. The hair shaft and ends are especially vulnerable to damage from the relaxing process unless you protect them. Applying a light coating of something like olive oil, castor oil, a thick conditioner, grease or vaseline to your scalp and hair past the new growth prevents the rest of your hair from being "re-relaxed" as a result of overlapping and runoff during the final rinsing of the relaxer. Protection for the length and ends of the hair is essential because the short, compact nature of the new growth makes it is virtually impossible to avoid overlap. This "chemical run" and lack of protection for the shaft and ends is one of the many reasons quite a few relaxed ladies have thinner, and thinner ends.

Also remember, that oiling the new growth itself may leave you underprocessed because the relaxer has to penetrate through the layers you have put on. If you want a straighter turnout, be sure that you do not coat your new growth-- only coat your scalp and hair shaft past the new growth. As always, apply protective base (vaseline, oil, grease) to your scalp, tops of ears, and other sensitive areas . The base will give you an extra layer of protection between the relaxer crème and those areas.



bump bump bump.

SHIRO
07-03-2010, 12:47 AM
Thanks a lot Toya for this very valuable info.Now there's no reason why my hair should get damaged or my scalp burnt during my next relaxer/texlaxing.

nikasut
11-15-2011, 06:13 PM
I found this and wanted to share.

Want to learn how to prepare your hair for chemical relaxing and straightening? This article will teach you a four-step hair preparation strategy that you can use to protect your hair just prior to any chemical relaxer service!

We must begin with the obvious: chemical hair relaxing is a very stressful process on the hair. Because of the aggressive nature of these straightening chemicals and the extreme consequences that may arise from improper usage, careful thought and consideration should be given to preparing the hair for this process.

Prepping the Hair:
First and foremost, only begin the relaxer process with hair that is in tip top shape. Many of us say: Oh my hair is breaking...or shedding let me go ahead relax it! But, you must understand that you are taking a huge gamble with your hair health by proceeding with a chemical relaxer application on compromised hair.
Never relax your hair to "solve" a hair problem. You should always correct the problem first with the proper treatment. If your problem is hair breakage, you must pinpoint the cause of the breakage and treat the hair accordingly. You'll simply need to increase the moisture you give your hair if your breakage is from an overuse of protein, or increase the protein if your breakage is a result of over-conditioning. If your problem is shedding, be patient and let nature do what it needs to do first. Some have had success with garlic shampoo treatments for shedding problems, but because shedding is a response to natural, hormonal processes, topical treatments may not work.

Only when your hair and scalp have returned to normal should you proceed with your relaxer service. Relaxing your hair will only aggravate the condition you are facing by making your hair weaker and more vulnerable to damage. These strong chemicals could cause you even more breakage, shedding, or permanent hair loss if done to fix an existing hair problem. I cannot stress this enough ladies, relaxing should never be used as a means of correcting hair issues. You must solve the problems of shedding, dryness, or breakage BEFORE you relax your hair.

Your 4 Step Pre-Relaxer Game Plan
Preparing your hair for a relaxer is one of the best things you can do for your hair heath.You can follow these pre and post relaxer strategies whether you self relax or see a stylist for your chemical treatments. Ensuring your hair is in top physical condition prior to the relaxer service will give you better results with the finished product.

Step 1: Clean it Up!
Your final shampooing should take place on the last 3-5 days before your relaxer. At this wash (particularly if you desire a straighter, more thoroughly processed result), you should use a clarifying shampoo to remove any deposits or product buildup on the hair. A clarifiying shampoo, or any "stripping" shampoo containing the detergents Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate or Ammonium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate will be strong enough to remove buildup and maintain a clean and clear head of hair. (Assuming you use minimal or non- heavy products leading up to your hair service.) I highly recommend Pantene Pro-V Purity Shampoo ($3-5) for clarifying purposes. If you do not wish to have a bone straight look and prefer some texture, then you may continue to apply your products in their normal ratios up until the relaxer.

You should treat your hair to a protein treatment the final wash before your relaxer. Follow up the treatment with a good moisturizing deep conditioning. Giving your hair a protein treatment in the days leading up to your relaxer application gives your hair little more protein to work with going into the relaxer. This prevents the relaxing process from totally compromising the strength of your hair when your inner protein bonds are manipulated. To determine which strength of protein reconstructor to use, I would first do a breakage assessment of the hair. If you are already having some breakage, I would go with a moderate to heavy treatment for damaged hair. I recommend the Aphogee Treament for Damaged Hair (under $8) for heavy protein conditioning. If you don't have any noticeable breakage, then a lighter/milder treatment should be fine. I recommend Aphogee 2 Minute Keratin Reconstructor or Motions CPR Conditioner for light protein conditioning. Both products are less than $5 at any beauty supply store. You can substitute whatever brand of protein reconstructor/conditioner you like to use. Do not proceed with the relaxer application if you are still having noticable breakage or shedding. After you have completed steps 1 and 2, do not wash, scratch, or do anything to disturb your scalp.

Step 3: Protect It!
The day of relaxer, pay special attention to the length and ends of your hair. The hair shaft and ends are especially vulnerable to damage from the relaxing process unless you protect them. Applying a light coating of something like olive oil, castor oil, a thick conditioner, grease or vaseline to your scalp and hair past the new growth prevents the rest of your hair from being "re-relaxed" as a result of overlapping and runoff during the final rinsing of the relaxer. Protection for the length and ends of the hair is essential because the short, compact nature of the new growth makes it is virtually impossible to avoid overlap. This "chemical run" and lack of protection for the shaft and ends is one of the many reasons quite a few relaxed ladies have thinner, and thinner ends.

Also remember, that oiling the new growth itself may leave you underprocessed because the relaxer has to penetrate through the layers you have put on. If you want a straighter turnout, be sure that you do not coat your new growth-- only coat your scalp and hair shaft past the new growth. As always, apply protective base (vaseline, oil, grease) to your scalp, tops of ears, and other sensitive areas . The base will give you an extra layer of protection between the relaxer crème and those areas.

Sigh that's why I love this forum soo much, so informative. Thank You I need this, I only knew abt protein treatments...but the coating with olive oil, coconut oil etc :eek: what? Why couldn't I have known this before

nikasut
11-15-2011, 06:21 PM
The day of relaxer, pay special attention to the length and ends of your hair. The hair shaft and ends are especially vulnerable to damage from the relaxing process unless you protect them. Applying a light coating of something like olive oil, castor oil, a thick conditioner, grease or vaseline to your scalp and hair past the new growth prevents the rest of your hair from being "re-relaxed" as a result of overlapping and runoff during the final rinsing of the relaxer. Protection for the length and ends of the hair is essential because the short, compact nature of the new growth makes it is virtually impossible to avoid overlap. This "chemical run" and lack of protection for the shaft and ends is one of the many reasons quite a few relaxed ladies have thinner, and thinner ends.


Not discrediting the information, just wondering if anybody has proof of this, personal experience is the best evidence

evanny
11-16-2011, 08:50 AM
The day of relaxer, pay special attention to the length and ends of your hair. The hair shaft and ends are especially vulnerable to damage from the relaxing process unless you protect them. Applying a light coating of something like olive oil, castor oil, a thick conditioner, grease or vaseline to your scalp and hair past the new growth prevents the rest of your hair from being "re-relaxed" as a result of overlapping and runoff during the final rinsing of the relaxer. Protection for the length and ends of the hair is essential because the short, compact nature of the new growth makes it is virtually impossible to avoid overlap. This "chemical run" and lack of protection for the shaft and ends is one of the many reasons quite a few relaxed ladies have thinner, and thinner ends.


Not discrediting the information, just wondering if anybody has proof of this, personal experience is the best evidence


Yep. I do it very relaxer without fail.

nikasut
11-16-2011, 02:55 PM
So what's the scientific reasoning behind it??? Why does it prevent it from being re relaxed? Prevents the chemicals from penetrating the hair ? :confused:

evanny
11-18-2011, 06:25 PM
The relaxer has to penetrate through the layers that you have put onto your hair. When it's coated with a thick conditioner/oil/vaseline, it takes it longer to actually get to your hair because it's too busy trying to go through what you have put on it first. This is why ladies who wish to be texlaxed will add oil to the new-growth or even add oil into the relaxer itself. (I have done both) It slows the processing time dramatically. It's also the same reason why you base your scalp and edges.

nikasut
11-18-2011, 08:17 PM
The relaxer has to penetrate through the layers that you have put onto your hair. When it's coated with a thick conditioner/oil/vaseline, it takes it longer to actually get to your hair because it's too busy trying to go through what you have put on it first. This is why ladies who wish to be texlaxed will add oil to the new-growth or even add oil into the relaxer itself. (I have done both) It slows the processing time dramatically. It's also the same reason why you base your scalp and edges.

Thank You! this is valid information. So I guess its safe for me to self relax....I am always worried about overlapping so I guess I know to avoid that now, in addition to my protein treatment of course :P

evanny
11-19-2011, 08:30 AM
Thank You! this is valid information. So I guess its safe for me to self relax....I am always worried about overlapping so I guess I know to avoid that now, in addition to my protein treatment of course :P

Yes, but with that said, its still important to get it done within the time limit. I set a timer for mine...well my mom does. lol All that extra protection, IMO, doesn't really do much if the relaxer is left on too long. HTH :)

Jaydee89
12-01-2011, 11:49 PM
It makes a lot of sense to protect the previously relaxed hair with oils in order to prevent over-lapping.
I'm worried though because I'm supposed to relax my hair in 2 days and last night I moisturized and sealed my hair with glycerin and water mix and coconut oil. I also massaged my scalp with a lil coconut oil and castor oil. :confused;Will this cause me to be under processed when I relax on Sunday? :scared:How long will it take for the oil to evaporate from my new growth if I don't moisturize and seal from today??? Should I postpone relaxing in order to avoid a disaster??? Please help!!!!:confused: