View Full Version : I'm starting to notice dry, scaly,white patches in my scalp!


btru2u
08-08-2009, 01:41 PM
Do anybody else experience this? What is that about?

abbyZ
08-08-2009, 02:13 PM
I haven't experienced it, but I think it would be best to see your doctor or dermatologist. If it's not dandruff, it could be eczema or something. Hopefully, it's just dryness. I think this could be the case if you've recently changed your products or diet or even because of a dry, hot climate.

Amina
08-09-2009, 09:16 AM
I used to have a similar problem...thick, scaly patches of what I thought was some type of dandruff. No matter how much oil/grease I put on it, or how much I scratched my scalp, it would still reappear. I went to the derm and they dubbed it seborrheic dermatitis. Needless to say the meds required too many applications and refills for me (I wanted to keep my wrap ungreasy and money in my pocket). I've just recently (the past 3 months) been able to rid myself of the problem with the help of this forum :D. Frequent co-washing, pooing with Dr. Bronner's Tea Tree or Peppermint Castile Soaps, and applying castor oil (which is anti-microbial) has cured my scly/dry scalp issues, all of that basically just kept my scalp clean. I would see the derm just to confirm/be sure of the diagnosis, but these are steps u can take now to help ur situation out! Don't fret though hun, doesn't sound like it's anything major!

LilMissRed
08-09-2009, 09:57 AM
I used to have a similar problem...thick, scaly patches of what I thought was some type of dandruff. No matter how much oil/grease I put on it, or how much I scratched my scalp, it would still reappear. I went to the derm and they dubbed it seborrheic dermatitis. Needless to say the meds required too many applications and refills for me (I wanted to keep my wrap ungreasy and money in my pocket). I've just recently (the past 3 months) been able to rid myself of the problem with the help of this forum :D. Frequent co-washing, pooing with Dr. Bronner's Tea Tree or Peppermint Castile Soaps, and applying castor oil (which is anti-microbial) has cured my scly/dry scalp issues, all of that basically just kept my scalp clean. I would see the derm just to confirm/be sure of the diagnosis, but these are steps u can take now to help ur situation out! Don't fret though hun, doesn't sound like it's anything major!


yep.. thats what my dermatologist called my patches.. hence.. Ive been transitioning since last yr.. Ive noticed I STILL have a couple patches.. they seem to heal.. (cause I scratch) but they come back as well.The Rx is expensive as heck, but Ive noticed that as long as I keep the area moisturized... I have less itching.. which for me equals less scratching

Amina
08-09-2009, 10:14 AM
yep.. thats what my dermatologist called my patches.. hence.. Ive been transitioning since last yr.. Ive noticed I STILL have a couple patches.. they seem to heal.. (cause I scratch) but they come back as well.The Rx is expensive as heck, but Ive noticed that as long as I keep the area moisturized... I have less itching.. which for me equals less scratching

Are u able to co-wash and stuff? Or I think u wear sew-ins/protective styles tho so u probly can't even keep urs clean like u'd want to. I know the castor oil and tea tree oil helps tremendously tho for those of us who can't wash the scalp as often. Moisture does help too. Aloe Vera Gel is anti-bacterial and moisturizing so it helps too, w/o being oily/greasy on the scalp.

angel_hair
08-10-2009, 10:05 AM
Amina, yep that's what it is and you have to keep the scalp clean and the hair moisturized. I thought I had it at one point in time myself.

angel_hair
08-10-2009, 10:10 AM
MORE INFORMATION!!!!

Seborrheic Dermatitis: What It Is and How to Treat It
What is seborrheic dermatitis?
Seborrheic dermatitis is a disease that causes flaking of the skin. It usually affects the scalp. In adolescents and adults, it is commonly called "dandruff." In babies, it is known as "cradle cap."

Seborrheic dermatitis can also affect the skin on other parts of the body, such as the face and chest, and the creases of the arms, legs and groin. Seborrheic dermatitis usually causes the skin to look a little greasy and scaly or flaky.
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How common is it?
Seborrheic dermatitis most often occurs in babies younger than 3 months of age and in adults from 30 to 60 years of age. In adults, it's more common in men than in women.
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What causes seborrheic dermatitis?
The exact cause isn't known. The cause may be different in infants and adults. Seborrheic dermatitis may be related to hormones, because the disorder often appears in infancy and disappears before puberty. Or the cause might be a fungus, called malassezia. This organism is normally present on the skin in small numbers, but sometimes its numbers increase, resulting in skin problems.

Seborrheic dermatitis has also been linked to neurologic disorders such as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. The reason for this relationship isn't known.

How is seborrheic dermatitis treated?
The treatment of seborrheic dermatitis depends on its location on the body. Treatment also depends on the person's age.

Seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp (dandruff) in adults and adolescents. Dandruff is usually treated with a shampoo that contains salicylic acid (some brand names: X-Seb, Scalpicin), the prescription medicine selenium sulfide (brand names: Selsun Blue, Exsel) or zinc pyrithione (some brand names: DHS Zinc, Head & Shoulders). These shampoos can be used 2 times a week. Shampoos with coal tar (some brand names: DHS Tar, Neutrogena T/Gel, Polytar) may be used 3 times a week. If you have dandruff, you might start by using one of these shampoos daily until your dandruff is controlled, and then use it 2 or 3 times a week.

When you use a dandruff shampoo, rub the shampoo into your hair thoroughly and let it stay on your hair and scalp for at least 5 minutes before rinsing. This will give it time to work.

If the shampoo alone doesn't help, your doctor might want you to use a prescription steroid lotion once or twice daily, in addition to the shampoo.

Seborrheic dermatitis of the skin creases in adolescents and adults. Steroid lotions may be used in adolescents and adults.

Seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp (cradle cap) in babies. Seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp in babies is treated with products that are not as strong as those used in adults. You might start with a mild, nonmedicated baby shampoo. Brushing your baby's scalp with a soft brush, like a toothbrush, can help loosen scales or flakes. But be gentle when massaging or brushing your baby's scalp--a break in the skin makes it vulnerable to infection. If a nonmedicated shampoo doesn't work, talk to your doctor about switching to a shampoo that contains tar. Or your doctor may recommend a prescription shampoo that contains 2% ketoconazole (brand name: Nizoral).

Seborrheic dermatitis of the skin creases in babies. Gentle steroid lotions or creams may be used to treat seborrheic dermatitis in the skin creases of babies.

evanny
08-10-2009, 10:35 AM
I used to have a similar problem...thick, scaly patches of what I thought was some type of dandruff. No matter how much oil/grease I put on it, or how much I scratched my scalp, it would still reappear. I went to the derm and they dubbed it seborrheic dermatitis. Needless to say the meds required too many applications and refills for me (I wanted to keep my wrap ungreasy and money in my pocket). I've just recently (the past 3 months) been able to rid myself of the problem with the help of this forum :D. Frequent co-washing, pooing with Dr. Bronner's Tea Tree or Peppermint Castile Soaps, and applying castor oil (which is anti-microbial) has cured my scly/dry scalp issues, all of that basically just kept my scalp clean. I would see the derm just to confirm/be sure of the diagnosis, but these are steps u can take now to help ur situation out! Don't fret though hun, doesn't sound like it's anything major!
Amina get out of my head!! I was just about to recommend everything that you did!;)

LilMissRed
08-10-2009, 11:47 AM
Are u able to co-wash and stuff? Or I think u wear sew-ins/protective styles tho so u probly can't even keep urs clean like u'd want to. I know the castor oil and tea tree oil helps tremendously tho for those of us who can't wash the scalp as often. Moisture does help too. Aloe Vera Gel is anti-bacterial and moisturizing so it helps too, w/o being oily/greasy on the scalp.

right.. Im wearing a full sew in so I cant do the co-wash thing, but I do use the castor and I have used the tea tree oils regularly

miana79
08-31-2009, 09:03 PM
100% tea three oil will rid this problem.

btru2u
09-01-2009, 11:19 AM
100% tea three oil will rid this problem.

Yeah, but I heard not to use tea tree oil by it self, you should always mix it with a carrier oil...

buckeyeinminn
03-28-2010, 08:57 PM
I am glad I found this post. I have been having this same problem. Will definitely try the castor oil

JLicious
03-29-2010, 02:12 AM
I am glad I found this post. I have been having this same problem. Will definitely try the castor oil

I have the SD condition too. I was told by a woman at an herb shop that the fungus is caused by yeast, and eating too much sugar feeds the yeast. So, she told me to stay away from breads/starches, and refined sugar.

All of the other remedies mentioned here like frequent washing etc. will help also. I've also read that extra virgin coconut oil has anti-fungal properties and will help with this problem.

bejai
03-29-2010, 04:39 AM
I'm glad to see this post, I've experienced this before and seems like it's coming back.

vrveerar
05-23-2011, 11:01 AM
Hi,
I too had this problem and went to the dermatologist only to find out that I have lupus. Lupus is an autoimmune disease which causes your immune system to attack health cells and organs. It could be genetic or caused due to medication (genetic in my case). In my case, it was genetic and was attacking my skin cells causing a dry white scaly patches of skin to accumulate on my scalp, usually along the hairline or behind the ears.
I don't want to alarm anybody but if anybody could heed from my example, I will always say that it might be best to go to a doctor to at least find out what is happening to your body.

Thank you and god bless!

PurplePeony
12-20-2012, 08:48 AM
Hi,
I too had this problem and went to the dermatologist only to find out that I have lupus. Lupus is an autoimmune disease which causes your immune system to attack health cells and organs. It could be genetic or caused due to medication (genetic in my case). In my case, it was genetic and was attacking my skin cells causing a dry white scaly patches of skin to accumulate on my scalp, usually along the hairline or behind the ears.
I don't want to alarm anybody but if anybody could heed from my example, I will always say that it might be best to go to a doctor to at least find out what is happening to your body.

Thank you and god bless!

yep... lupus, psoriatic arthritis & many other diseases can cause scaly patches on the scalp. That`s why it`s always best to see a doctor for a proper evaluation.
I hope you`re doing ok. That`s a very painful disease.