View Full Version : Pressing Questions


denalove
02-21-2008, 10:30 PM
Are pressing combs in a jar still out there? Or is this just a ploy to sell another type of perm that's just less gentle? Does anyone even still get their hair pressed? I am wondering if this trend is still in existence..if so, who does press in the Mississippi area? I need some suggestions.

hairforu
03-01-2008, 04:26 PM
Hello I am not in mississippi but I do press. I just don,t call it pressing I call it silking because when I get through it looks silky and it feels like it to.I use a comb for the edges and a flat iron for the rest of the hair.I also use a damn good shampoo for starters. That,s my secret.

Dividir
03-11-2008, 03:10 PM
what is pressing in a jar?

denalove
03-13-2008, 10:55 AM
Dividir,
It's usually called PCJ...I think it's just a really mild relaxer for kids.

The Anti Hair Slave
03-16-2008, 04:47 PM
I HATE HATE HATE hot combs... I remember my mom using it to straighten my hair and she would ALWAYS burn my ears. It never failed. It was the worst. Anyone else experience this?

denalove
03-16-2008, 11:57 PM
Oh yes...I am old school. I got burned so many times that I swore not to put my daughter through this. It sucks!! So I went ahead and did the relaxer/texturizer on her beautiful curly hair that was so hard to manage.:( I was asking for a friend whose daughter lives in Ms that still presses her hair , and she's 15! :eek:

The Anti Hair Slave
03-18-2008, 12:11 PM
Oh no that sucks! I can't imagine still getting my hair pressed at 15.

browneyedgirl
03-31-2008, 04:19 PM
It depends on what type of pressing comb you use and what setting. I got mine pressed until I was about 17, It is a burden. With today's technology, I am surprised anyone would bother with this. Good luck.:rolleyes:

JLicious
04-03-2008, 09:36 AM
All of the salons I know of press with flat irons or marcels. I'm afraid of using a pressing comb...i'm sure I would burn myself.

Dividir
04-04-2008, 07:08 AM
oh. thanks denalove.

Ive seen it but never tried it

kita
04-24-2008, 03:14 AM
I just recently stopped pressing my hair. I perspire to much at night, my hair tends to convert to its natural state. I used this liquid called Vigorol, which to me is like a blowout. Vigorol is used for silking the hair (pressing). Vigorol helps the hair stay pressed. I also used a pressing wax for moisture contol. This is very old school. I had no breakage with this product. I would go to the salon to get a hard press and it would cost $40 -$45. The salon service was to pricey.

Pebbles
08-18-2008, 06:50 PM
It was a relaxer.

Barbara
01-09-2009, 09:50 PM
Some of us still get our hair pressed.

Vermelha
01-10-2009, 02:27 PM
I just recently stopped pressing my hair. I perspire to much at night, my hair tends to convert to its natural state. I used this liquid called Vigorol, which to me is like a blowout. Vigorol is used for silking the hair (pressing). Vigorol helps the hair stay pressed. I also used a pressing wax for moisture contol. This is very old school. I had no breakage with this product. I would go to the salon to get a hard press and it would cost $40 -$45. The salon service was to pricey.


Mmm....
I've heard more bad than good...
And the hair is no longer natural when using vigorol. My mom tried to talk me into it.

Honestly: Pressed hair is pressed hair. Chemically-treated hair is, well, chemically treated.

jasnian0313
01-10-2009, 06:56 PM
vermelha do u press ur hair?? how often do u think someone can press/flat iron/straighten their hair without them losing their natural curl pattern too bad?? ive been wondering about that cause i was thinking about the styles that i want to do when i am all natural and i still want to be able to straighten my hair

Vermelha
01-11-2009, 08:00 AM
vermelha do u press ur hair?? how often do u think someone can press/flat iron/straighten their hair without them losing their natural curl pattern too bad?? ive been wondering about that cause i was thinking about the styles that i want to do when i am all natural and i still want to be able to straighten my hair

Yep! I straighten twice a year for trims.

As far as altering the hair pattern, I did this years ago when i first transitioned and became fully natural. What happens is when we press our hair, we have a tendency to go over it throughout the week with a curling iron or flat iron for touching up. When we do this, it adds more heat and damage to hair that is already heat damaged.

When you wash, the curl pattern will be looser. E.g., if your natural hair was 4a and after straightening, the ends look 3b/3c, you have heat damage that is irreversible.

Once a month is perfectly fine! But it not only depends on how often you straighten but how high the temperature is. Even straightening once on a too hot temperature can damage the hair. Just do it at the most, monthly, and be sure to avoid re-straightening or touching up the hair with heat tools while straightened. Use rollersets instead or wrap the hair while dry before bed to keep the straight style.

Also, invest in a great heat protector. I suggest Tresemme but there are lots of others the ladies have raved about. There's a thread somewhere...

brittbritt
01-13-2009, 10:44 AM
I straighten my hair a few times a year because most of the time it's all covered up with wigs, or protective styling. Anyway when I do straighten i use mega silk. This stuff is the truth. It gets my hair straight to the roots and last for quite a while. the final product is silky and shiny.

pin up gal
01-26-2009, 01:44 PM
i get my hair pressed two times per months along with flat ironing. My hair is silky smooth and shoulder lengths. I would not dream of putting any chemicals in my hair.

LadyNaps
02-08-2009, 11:19 AM
flat irons are definitely the best i love the range of different setting you can have. i have different textures in my hair so i may use a higher setting for the naps in the back than i use from my naps around my temple

steffiejoe
03-16-2009, 07:40 PM
I straighten my hair a few times a year because most of the time it's all covered up with wigs, or protective styling. Anyway when I do straighten i use mega silk. This stuff is the truth. It gets my hair straight to the roots and last for quite a while. the final product is silky and shiny.

Who makes mega silk? I've never heard of it.

LadyNaps
03-23-2009, 04:19 PM
I just have 1 teeny tiny question.

The only way you can effectively avoid breakage when flat ironing is to ensure hair is moisturized. Over 85% of all BHP members use oil to seal moisture in correct? So if water based moisturizers moisture hair and water cannot penetrate past oil than the second time you use a moisture and next oil. Isn't the moisturizer just sitting on top of the oil until the next time you wash your hair and remove the oil? If the water based moisturizer has evaporated inside the oil then isn't the hair now dry and prone to breakage. Moreover isn't the oil simply blocking out moisture so the now thirsty hair can't even pick up water particles from the surrounding air? And for everyone that presses their hair I am hoping you are using a heating protectant correct? There is a 8/10 chance that this heating protectant has silicones in it because silicones are often a primary ingredient. Well if silicones are in addition added to the hair with the oil doesn't this form a secondary layer of resistance to water? and even if you didn't use oil after moisturizing but did decided to use the heat protectant if you attempt to moisturize your hair isn't it nearly sitting on top of the non water permeable silicones? Doesn't flat irons work by removing the moisture from the hair shaft thus making the hair straight? So how can the hair receive moisture daily and still have a nice style that excludes simply wearing the hair in its natural state.

BRAIDS.

I wear microbraids all the time and love them. I moisture my hair by rinsing with water 2x a day. I am able to avoid silicones, oil, and heat. I cowash with conditioner and acv rinse weekly to avoid product build up. Since I am rinsing 2x daily with water and not using harmful products I can afford not to DC weekly because my hair is already properly moisturized. My edges have never thinned or broken off because I tell the stylist not to braid them tightly and I am not using products so I do not have knots full of build up and matted hair that weigh down and break the hair. After 6 weeks I remove the braids and perform a protein reconstructor and DC. While I am letting my hair breathe for 2 weeks before the next application of braids i wear a wig to avoid heat and silicones. I am able to retain all of my length every month and the length of my hair has tripled from my BC in only 3 months.

Vermelha
03-23-2009, 11:09 PM
I just have 1 teeny tiny question.

The only way you can effectively avoid breakage when flat ironing is to ensure hair is moisturized. Over 85% of all BHP members use oil to seal moisture in correct? So if water based moisturizers moisture hair and water cannot penetrate past oil than the second time you use a moisture and next oil. Isn't the moisturizer just sitting on top of the oil until the next time you wash your hair and remove the oil? If the water based moisturizer has evaporated inside the oil then isn't the hair now dry and prone to breakage. Moreover isn't the oil simply blocking out moisture so the now thirsty hair can't even pick up water particles from the surrounding air? And for everyone that presses their hair I am hoping you are using a heating protectant correct? There is a 8/10 chance that this heating protectant has silicones in it because silicones are often a primary ingredient. Well if silicones are in addition added to the hair with the oil doesn't this form a secondary layer of resistance to water? and even if you didn't use oil after moisturizing but did decided to use the heat protectant if you attempt to moisturize your hair isn't it nearly sitting on top of the non water permeable silicones? Doesn't flat irons work by removing the moisture from the hair shaft thus making the hair straight? So how can the hair receive moisture daily and still have a nice style that excludes simply wearing the hair in its natural state.

BRAIDS.

I wear microbraids all the time and love them. I moisture my hair by rinsing with water 2x a day. I am able to avoid silicones, oil, and heat. I cowash with conditioner and acv rinse weekly to avoid product build up. Since I am rinsing 2x daily with water and not using harmful products I can afford not to DC weekly because my hair is already properly moisturized. My edges have never thinned or broken off because I tell the stylist not to braid them tightly and I am not using products so I do not have knots full of build up and matted hair that weigh down and break the hair. After 6 weeks I remove the braids and perform a protein reconstructor and DC. While I am letting my hair breathe for 2 weeks before the next application of braids i wear a wig to avoid heat and silicones. I am able to retain all of my length every month and the length of my hair has tripled from my BC in only 3 months.

Well, to help clarify some things, using oil while heat styling hair is detrimental, period. What happens when you put heat in a hot skillet, it starts to fry. That is what happens to hair when you use heat styling tools when oil is on the hair.

And also, some oils, when rinsed, can break down. Some oils cut other oils. Castile soap, for instance, is nothing but saponified oils that cut through other existing oils. Co-washing helps break down oils so that at least some moisture can penetrate through to the hair shaft. Synthetic oils, like petrochemicals such as mineral oil, vaseline, paraffinium liquidium and petroleum/petrolatum, do completely block moisture in and out and aren't easily broken down like natural oils such as olive and jojoba.

And NO. Flat irons do not work by removing the moisture from the hair. Heat, when applied at higher temperatures, can temporarily alter the composition of a strand of hair, allowing it to be shaped and formed however the stylist chooses. Flat irons CAN remove moisture from the hair when used at too hot of a temperature.

This is where heat protectants come in. Heat protectants, be it spray or serum, leave a protective silicone on the hair shaft, allowing the heat styling tool to pass through the hair with ease and without the tugging and pulling that often causes breakage, while leaving a sort of buffer on the hair shaft to minimize excessive heat trauma to the individual strands. Heat protectants are great.

When you apply ANY kind of heat to the hair, the hair must be clean. There should be no residues of any kind (shampoo or conditioner), nor any oils. A heat protectant should be the only thing used. Avocado oil is the only exception, since it is one of few oils that can be heated at high temperatures. Many have used coconut oil for heat styling as well, which actually helps preserve the moisture levels in the hair while heat styling. Other oils don't withstand heat very well and shouldn't be used for straightening the hair.

The process of preparing to heat styling hair should be to style on clean, shampooed and conditioned hair. Then, lightly spray or apply a heat protectant. I would suggest either airdrying or blowdrying on the ionic setting with medium to low heat for minimal damage. Also, using tension instead of using a comb to stretch out hair significantly reduces damage as well. Then, in small sections, straighten hair with the heat styling tool. Oils and serums can be used afterwards, but only to protect hair from environmental factors that cause frizz and breakage.

And FYI, straightened hair, especially natural hair, can't be moisturized after straightening or reversion will take place. This is why heat styling should be kept at a minimum. There isn't a means of adding moisture to heat styled hair without it reverting to it's natural state. It completely defeats all efforts put into styling the hair. Relaxed hair, however, can be moisturized because it is chemically broken down to be straight, regardless of moisture. It won't revert.

LadyNaps
03-24-2009, 09:51 AM
Thanks vermelha! I successfully found a way to have my question answered for the first time while simultaneously surpassing the point/credit system that forces you to post something everyday. Lol

There's nothing like intentionally posting inaccurate hair information to get a hair obsessed BHP moderator to personally rebuttal you thus giving you the information that you actually needed lol.

In your FYI response to me you stated that no oils with the exception of avacado (good job) cocoa nut oil, olive, and jojoba, should be used because they fry hair and block moisture. If you are natural that regularly presses wouldn't it be more effective to apply a chemically straightening relaxer because if you want a straight look than but still want to keep the hair moisturized despite heat protectant silicones that block moisture out you would have to constantly cowash and re add the heat and silicones unto your hair? even if you use a castile soap to cut through the oil the process of washing and reheating is still damaging for naturals who regularly press.

You said that "co washing helps breaks down the oils so at least some of the moisture can penetrate to the hair shaft" when you say some what amount are you referring to exactly?

25% 50% or only 60% what percent of the oils are being broken down by cowashing?

Conditioners aren't strong enough to break down silicones so is an ACV rinse strong enough? im more scared of the silicones than I am heat because heat can be applied at a low temperature but silicones make it difficult for moisture to penetrate to my hair shaft.

You also stated that flat irons only remove moisture from the hair when they are set to high enough temperatures. I always use the lowest setting possible on my hair but everyones flat iron is different. Do you know an estimation of the temperature or setting that removes the moisture from the hair because I don't want to DC only to have the moisture removed especially when silicones are going to be added.

I know water boils and evaporates at 100 degrees and some flat irons heat up to 400 or have a 1-25 control setting. Which setting do you use on your hair?

P.s. Your hair is gorgeous I loooooovvvveeeeve your hair!
Meanwhile if your hair constantly needs moisture than you would have to constantly add moisture and face reversion then re add heat and that is simply damaging to the hair correct?
On other forums and websites I have heard ladies speak of a moisturizer that prevents reversion completely. This can't be possible can it, because a moisturizer must be water based. Unless you know a moisturizer I don't.

Moreover, I have heard rumors of a heat protectant that does not use silicones or only uses silicones that are water soluble. Would you happen to know the name of any of these heat protectants or if the possiblity of their existance?

What im really tryna figure out is, is it logical, effective, possible, or simply worth it to be a natural if your sole intention is to have a straightened look everyday? I am so so sooo terrified of relaxers its not even funny. After reading some enlightening post about the strength of sodium hydroxide and how its is strong enough to clean a pipe drain and burn the skin I vowed to never put that creamy crack on my hair.

After much research and debate I concluded that it is more wise and healthier to be a natural that regularly presses versus a relaxed that continually adds chemicals that weaken the hair.

Vermelha please give everyone on BHP your advice.
You stated that relaxed ladies can add as much moisture as they want without facing reversion. They also wouldn't need to apply heat continually or deal with heat protectant silicones because their hair is already straightened so what do you think?

Do you feel that being natural is only effective for ladies that rarely and occasionally straighten verus dummies like me that used to keep a straight style utilizing heat always?

How do you feel about relaxers? Can they ever be possibly okay if applied and maintained correctly? Or are they in your opinion always a No.

I felt so liberated to not be dependent on the hair stylist. Especially when no 1 will love and be as gentle with your hair as you would. With much practice and study do you think it will ever be possible to apply my own relaxer especially a virgin relaxer! or is too much risk involved still?

As stated in my previous post I have temporarily found the solutions to these unknown questions by simply keeping my hair braided. I still receive all the hair benefits of being natural while simultaneously maintaining a straight style.


What is YOUR opinion for all BHP naturals that regularly press?

Vermelha
03-24-2009, 11:46 AM
Thanks vermelha! I successfully found a way to have my question answered for the first time while simultaneously surpassing the point/credit system that forces you to post something everyday. Lol

There's nothing like intentionally posting inaccurate hair information to get a hair obsessed BHP moderator to personally rebuttal you thus giving you the information that you actually needed lol.

In your FYI response to me you stated that no oils with the exception of avacado (good job) cocoa nut oil, olive, and jojoba, should be used because they fry hair and block moisture. If you are natural that regularly presses wouldn't it be more effective to apply a chemically straightening relaxer because if you want a straight look than but still want to keep the hair moisturized despite heat protectant silicones that block moisture out you would have to constantly cowash and re add the heat and silicones unto your hair? even if you use a castile soap to cut through the oil the process of washing and reheating is still damaging for naturals who regularly press.

Well, the thing is, you can never completely eliminate damage when it comes to heat. This is why other methods like rollersets are advised. Also, a relaxer would eliminate most of the heat usage, but the relaxer itself is much more traumatizing to natural hair than just pressing it every two weeks. With natural hair, the bonds return (hence reversion)


You said that "co washing helps breaks down the oils so at least some of the moisture can penetrate to the hair shaft" when you say some what amount are you referring to exactly?

25% 50% or only 60% what percent of the oils are being broken down by cowashing?

I would say about at least 75 percent breakdown or more, depending on how much you co-wash. If you're using a lighter oil like olive, it should be more like 80-90 percent. Heavier oils like castor, would take much more to rinse away.

Conditioners aren't strong enough to break down silicones so is an ACV rinse strong enough? im more scared of the silicones than I am heat because heat can be applied at a low temperature but silicones make it difficult for moisture to penetrate to my hair shaft.

Well, the thing is about silicones is that if you use them on wet hair, the moisture will be sealed in. And some silicones do break down and rinse away. Not all, but some do. However, on dry hair, it will block out moisture. Sometimes, cones are needed, especially for naturals who have tangles and need a product with "slip" to be able to comb through the hair while wet. Though I use oils, some oils can be too heavy for some, hence the preference of using cones over oils, since they're much less greasy.

You also stated that flat irons only remove moisture from the hair when they are set to high enough temperatures. I always use the lowest setting possible on my hair but everyones flat iron is different. Do you know an estimation of the temperature or setting that removes the moisture from the hair because I don't want to DC only to have the moisture removed especially when silicones are going to be added.

The idea of doing a DC before straightening is not to just put additional moisture back into the hair, but to strengthen hair before and after heat styling. I DC before, to prepare the hair, and after, to repair the hair. Don't feel like it's a 'lost cause', because it's very necessary.

I know water boils and evaporates at 100 degrees and some flat irons heat up to 400 or have a 1-25 control setting. Which setting do you use on your hair?

I own a Maxiglide MP, which has 1-10 setting on it, plus steam technology. I use it on 4-5. I would assume that is about 280-325 degrees Fahrenheit, but since there is steam technology infused, I use much less heat. On my Conair Silver Tourmaline, I would use about 325-360. I only use one pass through the hair and prefer to airdry before using a flat iron.

P.s. Your hair is gorgeous I loooooovvvveeeeve your hair!
Thanks!!!!

Meanwhile if your hair constantly needs moisture than you would have to constantly add moisture and face reversion then re add heat and that is simply damaging to the hair correct?
On other forums and websites I have heard ladies speak of a moisturizer that prevents reversion completely. This can't be possible can it, because a moisturizer must be water based. Unless you know a moisturizer I don't.

Sabino Moisture Block is a great product for defying moisture from seeping in and reverting the hair. It also locks in the moisture into each strand to prevent hair from drying out. It's not a moisturizer. That's the thing. You can't use a moisturizer on straightened natural hair. And yes, it is ultimately damaging to use a heat tool, and reuse it again on already heat styled hair. You must wash before you apply a heat tool again. If not, you will continue to break down the hair bonds even further and as a result, irreversible heat damage.

Moreover, I have heard rumors of a heat protectant that does not use silicones or only uses silicones that are water soluble. Would you happen to know the name of any of these heat protectants or if the possiblity of their existance?

I use Tresemmé, which has cones that are water-soluble. Motions also has one that is water-soluble.

What im really tryna figure out is, is it logical, effective, possible, or simply worth it to be a natural if your sole intention is to have a straightened look everyday? I am so so sooo terrified of relaxers its not even funny. After reading some enlightening post about the strength of sodium hydroxide and how its is strong enough to clean a pipe drain and burn the skin I vowed to never put that creamy crack on my hair.

In my opinion, the idea of going natural is to regain the versatility and health that relaxed hair simply doesn't have. And no, it shouldn't be a bad thing to be natural and want to have straight hair. If you straighten every two weeks and or use rollers, you can achieve the straight look. Also, by using the right products and techniques, your hair can stay straight for a while. It's not that difficult to achieve straight hair, but it's also good to understand to know your limits, and that's for everyone that uses heat styling tools. They can be abused, but when used right, it is MUCH healthier than getting a relaxer. But if you know you will abuse heat, get a relaxer done instead.

After much research and debate I concluded that it is more wise and healthier to be a natural that regularly presses versus a relaxed that continually adds chemicals that weaken the hair.

Vermelha please give everyone on BHP your advice.
You stated that relaxed ladies can add as much moisture as they want without facing reversion. They also wouldn't need to apply heat continually or deal with heat protectant silicones because their hair is already straightened so what do you think?

Relaxed hair still needs to be straightened somehow. Relaxers don't usually get Afro hair bone straight unless by means of overprocessing. They don't need to, but many do anyway, and that further exaggerates damage. If everyone with a relaxer just rollerset and or used lower temperatures, their hair would be healther. But that's not always the case. If someone with relaxed hair continues to use heat, they may as well not get a relaxer at all.

Do you feel that being natural is only effective for ladies that rarely and occasionally straighten verus dummies like me that used to keep a straight style utilizing heat always?

Being natural is best for ladies who straighten on occasion or rarely. If you are natural and still opt for heat styling tools, it is OK, but just remember to protect and treat the hair. If you don't need a relaxer, don't get it.

How do you feel about relaxers? Can they ever be possibly okay if applied and maintained correctly? Or are they in your opinion always a No.

Relaxed hair can look great, but that doesn't mean it is great in my opinion. Afro hair is already fragile and processing it to further the fragility of the hair is like taking two steps back. But there is a such thing as healthy relaxed hair, but that goes with regular trims, deep conditioning often and little to no heat at all.

I felt so liberated to not be dependent on the hair stylist. Especially when no 1 will love and be as gentle with your hair as you would. With much practice and study do you think it will ever be possible to apply my own relaxer especially a virgin relaxer! or is too much risk involved still?

I wouldn't recommend it.

As stated in my previous post I have temporarily found the solutions to these unknown questions by simply keeping my hair braided. I still receive all the hair benefits of being natural while simultaneously maintaining a straight style.

What is YOUR opinion for all BHP naturals that regularly press?

My overall opinion is to go easy on the heat. Just because we are natural, doesn't mean we can abuse our hair. Not having a relaxer, but perpetually damaging the hair is just as bad as mistreating relaxed hair.




My answers are in red.

godiva
03-24-2009, 01:32 PM
V, do you use the Tresseme Heat Tamer?

Carolinagirl_22
03-24-2009, 02:26 PM
I will sometimes press my edges with an electronic hot comb.. I use ultra sheen creme satin press...it is the best. It is not like regular pressing cremes and will not weigh your hair down. When I was natural I would use a small amount press my hair, bump the ends and wrap and no one..could tell the difference.

Vermelha
03-24-2009, 02:38 PM
V, do you use the Tresseme Heat Tamer?

Yes I do. It is my staple. When I can't find it, I use Motion's brand.
I've been using Tresemmé since 2005.

LadyNaps
03-25-2009, 11:46 PM
Thanks again V. Tresseme since 05? I admire you so if you use it im willing to try on my hair and the cones are water soluble u say. That's wassup! That means if I rinse my hair daily the cones will wash out? Wait...if their water soluble can moisturizer pass through or do I need to rinse the cones out? N motions wow! I would neva think. To be honest I underestimated motions bc it is so cheap! I never think good products can be low priced. Almost lyka too good 2 be true thing. Once again thanks 4 everything I know OD'd with the questions I couldn't take it I was so damn curious lol

Be well and God bless

Vermelha
03-26-2009, 09:58 AM
Thanks again V. Tresseme since 05? I admire you so if you use it im willing to try on my hair and the cones are water soluble u say. That's wassup! That means if I rinse my hair daily the cones will wash out? Wait...if their water soluble can moisturizer pass through or do I need to rinse the cones out? N motions wow! I would neva think. To be honest I underestimated motions bc it is so cheap! I never think good products can be low priced. Almost lyka too good 2 be true thing. Once again thanks 4 everything I know OD'd with the questions I couldn't take it I was so damn curious lol

Be well and God bless

Glad I could help! Good hair care can be inexpensive. I mean, there isn't a need for a miracle product. If you just stick to the basics, you'll reap good benefits. If you prepare well before and after, you'll come out OK!

brittbritt
03-26-2009, 10:04 AM
I use sally's GVP version of chi silk infusion or silk elements to press my hair with a hot comb or flat iron.

evanny
03-26-2009, 10:06 AM
Vermelha, tu conocimiento me asombra!

godiva
03-26-2009, 11:42 AM
Vermelha, tu conocimiento me asombra!

Me too!!!!

naturaljourny
05-05-2009, 11:41 AM
i don't necessarally put heat to my hair at all. but once in a blue moon i would want to straighten my hair what is the best type of flat iron to use for my hair type which is 4b/4c? i especially have trouble with my ends they are always frizzy so i would like a decent flat iron to help them stay smooth at least wont look like you can tell they are frizzy at the ends. :)

virtuouswoman
05-05-2009, 10:35 PM
my grandma still presses her hair and she taught me how to press hair, i press my aunts hair all the time...

breannab
05-18-2009, 10:02 PM
dose pressing always damage hair

creolesugar
05-18-2009, 10:03 PM
I think so. There are ways to minimize damage, but I believe that there's always SOME damage

breannab
05-18-2009, 10:03 PM
somtime i press it but it dosen't break my hair as much as it use to after i started takin care of it more

breannab
05-18-2009, 10:04 PM
but then also i really love my hair and i really dont like doing things if the damage it

creolesugar
05-18-2009, 10:05 PM
I guess it also depends on how often you press

virtuouswoman
05-19-2009, 05:12 AM
dose pressing always damage hair

it depends on how often you do it what you use on your hair to press it.....

Vermelha
05-19-2009, 07:26 AM
Visit this post at Spiced Honey for flat ironing tips. She has a great tutorial.

Spiced Honey (http://www.honeybrownsugar.com)

nicolechatt
05-19-2009, 02:28 PM
Damaged can be caused only if you press your hair with really high heat (above 300-350) alot without any protectant or not deep conditioning your hair.

4cgrow
06-19-2009, 05:26 PM
Anyone ever pressed type 4c successfully?

vicky3278
01-22-2010, 03:23 AM
Can anyone tell me what is the best pressing oil to use when pressing natural hair with no chemicals? I also would like to know what can I do to keep my hair from going back to nappy so quickly the minute I sweat or it rains?

Amina
01-22-2010, 01:58 PM
Can anyone tell me what is the best pressing oil to use when pressing natural hair with no chemicals? I also would like to know what can I do to keep my hair from going back to nappy so quickly the minute I sweat or it rains?

Sabino moisture block is good to stop the humidity and hair reversion. I wouldn't use an oil necessarily. How do u press it now? What heat protectant do u use, if any at all?

JLicious
01-23-2010, 07:27 AM
Can anyone tell me what is the best pressing oil to use when pressing natural hair with no chemicals? I also would like to know what can I do to keep my hair from going back to nappy so quickly the minute I sweat or it rains?

Try using Fantasia IC Polisher (Pink Bottle) when you blow dry. Then when you flat iron or press use Beyond the Zone - Turn Up the Heat spray heat protectant (at Sally's) on each section as you go.

I've also used Sabino Moisture Block. It was very good at preventing reversion, and is a heat protectant too. You are supposed to put some on your hair before blow drying and some more before you flat iron.

nu2nappy
05-21-2010, 07:41 AM
I am afraid to press my hair. I have heard somany horror stories about how the salon burned their hair and their curl pattern never came back. I have flat ioned my hair but not on a high setting and it was only to trim my ends. I want that versitility of straight when I want but I have worked to hard for healthy hair to let it go down he drain. Any suggestions?

kyounge1956
11-25-2010, 03:25 AM
Yes, some people still press their hair and I am one of them. I tried chemical relaxers and they made my hair feel like straw--so dry and stiff. After the second time (which must have been thirty years ago, or maybe more than that) I swore I'd never use a relaxer again, and I never have. Since then, I have always worn my hair either pressed or in an Afro.